Community Newcomer
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎03-12-2013
Accepted Solution
My customer claims the shoes I sold her got badly damaged after wearing once.

Hello All

 

I recently sold a pair of  'used' shoes that I considered to be in 'very good condition'; there were just a few scuff marks at the front and back which I mentioned and illustrated in photographs.  The soles were completely intact.

A week after they had been received, the buyer sent me a photo of badly cracked soles of the shoes I apparently sold her and said this happened after wearing only once.

However, she did admit that she had a pair of the same shoes which she had previously worn to bits, which is why she purchased my shoes; as a replacement.

Although there is a slight chance that she is telling the truth (after all, the shoes were not new), I find it hard to believe.

 

Should I assume my customer is telling the truth and process a refund?  She hasn't asked for one yet but I am expecting her to.

 

 

Accepted Solution
Community Member
Posts: 7,217
Registered: ‎26-10-2005
Answered
in reply to ginger_fro

Hi there,

 

Was it a pair of wedges and had they been plastic boxed and in a wardrobe for a few years??

 

Over the years there have been a few crumbling shoe questions and like most thought it was all a bit far fetched, and the buyer must be trying it on. Until the sole on my favourite wedged mules disintegrated underneath me. They looked perfect when I put them on and 2 hours later just cracked and crumbled like cake.

 

So yes its possible the buyer is telling the truth. If they open an item not as described case they will win as the system assumes the buyers honest. You would have to pay for tracked p&p for the return and then have to refund item + original p&p. If the returned shoes were definitely not yours, you'd have to try and appeal, which is not usually sucessful

 

Is there anything on the upper that would identify the shoes as the ones you sent? You can ask for some extra pictures showing the cracked sole and a clear shot of the upper. If they are definitely your shoes, it will be a lot cheaper to just refund.

 

Its best to ask them open a case, then refund via that as ebay can keep an account of the cases theyve opened, and your refund of final value fees should be automatic.  Cases no longer count against the seller provided ebay doesn't have to take action to enforce the refund.

Other Answers: 0